Drones news

Facebook's internet-beaming drone has completed its second test flight and didn't crash

Facebook's internet-beaming drone has completed its second test flight and didn't crash
Facebook's internet-beaming drone has completed its second test flight and didn't crash
<p><strong>Facebook has completed its second test flight for its solar-powered, internet-beaming drone called Aquila.</strong></p> <p><strong>The flight was conducted on May 22 in Yuma, Arizona and lasted for one hour and 46 minutes. Facebook said that the drone &quot;landed perfectly on our prepared landing site.&quot;</strong></p> <p><strong>An earlier version of Aquila was &quot;substantially damaged&quot; in a crash during its first test flight over Arizona last year, according to an&nbsp;<a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/why-facebooks-internet-beaming-drone-crashed-2016-12">investigation by the National Transportation Safety Board</a>.</strong></p> <p><strong>To avoid another crash, Facebook tweaked the design of Aquila by adding wing spoilers, a smoother exterior, and a &quot;horizontal propeller stopping mechanism.&quot; The second version of the drone also includes hundreds of sensors to record details about flight performance.</strong></p> <p><strong>Facebook plans to use Aquila to beam internet access to unconnected parts of the world. The drone is larger than a Boeing 737 and designed to stay aloft for months at a time at altitudes of roughly 60,000 feet. It&#39;s completely solar-powered and requires the same amount of energy to run as three blow dryers.</strong></p> <p>Aquila is one part of Facebook&#39;s multi-pronged effort to bring more people online around the world. With two billion users, the social network is nearing&nbsp;<a href="http://www.businessinsider.com/why-facebook-will-struggle-to-get-its-next-2-billion-users-2017-6">the limit of internet-connected people on earth it can currently reach</a>.</p>
7/2/2017
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